Learning To Read And Write Frederick Douglass Essay

Learning To Read And Write Frederick Douglass Essay-58
Arrangement: This essay is told through a series of stories about Douglass’ life.It goes in chronological order; the story begins with him having a desire to read, and ends with him learning how to write.

Arrangement: This essay is told through a series of stories about Douglass’ life.

I learned that literacy allowed slaves to view their “wretched condition, without the remedy,” (262).

Literacy revealed to Douglass just how horrible his condition was.

Knowledge is power, and in this case, caused immense pain for Douglass. His powerful words reveal his pain and cause the reader to feel sorry for him.

This quote supports the intention of the piece; it reveals the troubles and burdens that reading and writing placed upon Douglass.

Douglass mentions at the end of his essay that he would meet with boys that he knew could write, and have writing competitions with them.

He would also copy what his master had written, and tells his audience, “Thus, after a long, tedious effort for years, I finally succeeded in learning how to write,” (264).

To explain the anger he felt Douglass says, “…I would at times feel that learning to read had been a curse rather than a blessing.

It had given me a view of my wretched conditions, without the remedy.” (Douglass 262).

The piece tells of the troubles and repercussions that reading and writing bestowed on Douglass. His sentences are very direct and to the point; it is not difficult to decipher what he is trying to say.

For example, he begins his essay with, “I lived in Master Hugh’s family about seven years.

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